August 28, 2014
pascalcampion:

The view.

pascalcampion:

The view.

(via unicornachos)

August 28, 2014

notenoughtosurvive:

unamusedsloth:

Nude Portraits series by photographer Trevor Christensen

This is my new favorite thing

(via kitfits)

August 28, 2014

iluvsouthernafrica:

South Africa:

Young ladies train in Ballet in Soweto through The Joburg Ballet Development Programme

Photos by Madelene Cronje.

(via portionsforfoxes)

August 28, 2014
mercurieux:

Selene by Jules Louis Machard, 1874.

mercurieux:

Selene by Jules Louis Machard, 1874.

(via veinte9)

August 28, 2014

saatchiart:

Today marks the 7th anniversary of the dedication of Gerhard Richter’s “Cathedral Window” in Cologne, comprised of 11,500 squares of glass in 72 colors.

(Source: saatchiart.com, via qiowder)

August 26, 2014

micdotcom:

55 Twitter photos from space that will fill you with ethereal wonder

Reid Wiseman is a national treasure.

Follow micdotcom 

(via promentory)

1:22pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z88gZy1PGH3nM
  
Filed under: space 
August 26, 2014

nevver:

Laura Callaghan

(via veinte9)

August 25, 2014

(via emily--hope)

August 25, 2014

(Source: onetothestate, via anotherwaytostand)

3:11pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z88gZy1PBMQuu
  
Filed under: hair 
August 25, 2014
hermionejg:

newyorker:

Across Silicon Valley, tech workers tend to be disproportionately male. Vauhini Vara examines the trend.

"What makes certain companies look much more diverse than others may be that they happen to have fewer tech employees compared with workers in other areas, like marketers or salespeople."
"the astonishing maleness and whiteness of Silicon Valley’s tech workers has less to do with Silicon Valley itself than with the education system that prepares kids to work there—or, more often, doesn’t do so. Women earn about eighteen per cent of computer-science degrees in the U.S. Black and Hispanic students each earn ten per cent or fewer.”
"Corporate culture, with all of its subtle signifiers and codes of conduct, is invariably linked to society’s broader concept of culture—and all its complicated nuances having to do with race and gender. In Silicon Valley, it might seem innocuous, or even meritocratic, for a startup’s software programmers to sit at the top of the social hierarchy—but, when you consider that software programmers, as a group, tend more often to be white and male, this becomes more fraught. Washington told me that her students who intern in Silicon Valley often tell her that they worry about fitting in—not because they don’t know how to code (they do) but because their social lives are different from those of their co-workers. This may seem like a superficial concern until you consider that these differences may well be influencing their managers’ sense of whether they are a good “cultural” fit.
“You feel like you’re spinning your wheels when you’re pushing students to be the best and brightest, and telling them, ‘You need to be competitive,’ but when it’s time to interview, they can’t get jobs—not because they’re not technically sound, but because they don’t fit into the culture,” she told me.”

hermionejg:

newyorker:

Across Silicon Valley, tech workers tend to be disproportionately male. Vauhini Vara examines the trend.

"What makes certain companies look much more diverse than others may be that they happen to have fewer tech employees compared with workers in other areas, like marketers or salespeople."

"the astonishing maleness and whiteness of Silicon Valley’s tech workers has less to do with Silicon Valley itself than with the education system that prepares kids to work there—or, more often, doesn’t do so. Women earn about eighteen per cent of computer-science degrees in the U.S. Black and Hispanic students each earn ten per cent or fewer.”

"Corporate culture, with all of its subtle signifiers and codes of conduct, is invariably linked to society’s broader concept of culture—and all its complicated nuances having to do with race and gender. In Silicon Valley, it might seem innocuous, or even meritocratic, for a startup’s software programmers to sit at the top of the social hierarchy—but, when you consider that software programmers, as a group, tend more often to be white and male, this becomes more fraught. Washington told me that her students who intern in Silicon Valley often tell her that they worry about fitting in—not because they don’t know how to code (they do) but because their social lives are different from those of their co-workers. This may seem like a superficial concern until you consider that these differences may well be influencing their managers’ sense of whether they are a good “cultural” fit.

“You feel like you’re spinning your wheels when you’re pushing students to be the best and brightest, and telling them, ‘You need to be competitive,’ but when it’s time to interview, they can’t get jobs—not because they’re not technically sound, but because they don’t fit into the culture,” she told me.”

(Source: newyorker.com, via cordeliaistheone)